Only 15% of you write in the WP Admin Editor

WordCampUS happened the first weekend in December and with it Matt Mullenweg’s annual State of the Word with updates and future trends for WordPress and by projection also for WordPressdotcom. There were plenty of jaw-dropping announcements for everyone in Matt’s presentation, but the statistic that blew me away was this:

Continue reading “Only 15% of you write in the WP Admin Editor”

Register Now for WordCamp US

After attending this year’s WCEU, I cannot recommend highly enough going to what is the US’ largest WordCamp next weekend. Be inspired and make new WP friends!

Even if you can’t be there in person, WCUS will be livestreamed and an unlimited number of FREE Livestream tickets are available. Hope to “see” you there, in spite of the time difference!

If you missed it, don’t worry! All talks are recorded and uploaded to WordPress.tv post event.

N.B. The row of small images were pushed to my site’s Media Library when I reblogged this post from The WordPress.com News Blog. So that is still happening.

The WordPress.com Blog

The second annual WordCamp US, the biggest WordCamp in North America, is next month! Join us in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 2-4 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

WCUS features three tracks. Sessions include “Five Newsroom Tips for Better Website Content,”“How to Overcome Your Fears and Start Sharing Your Knowledge,”“Open Source Creativity,” “Finding Your Voice by Blogging,” and “Diversity and the Design Team.” Check out the full schedule to find your favorites — there are topics for everyone, from developers and designers working on WordPress every day to content creators and people just starting out.

To close out the conference, WordPress co-founder Matt Mullenweg will deliver the annual “State of the Word,” sharing the latest in WordPress news, offering his thoughts on the future of WordPress, and answering questions from the audience.

Tickets are $40 and include:

  • admission to both days of the conference (December 2 and 3),
  • access…

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Just don’t mention the “c” word

WordCamp Jerusalem took place this past Wednesday and welcomed a very nice turnout. I’ll write more at length about the full conference a bit later. What I want to write about now is a not uncommon perception that I encountered during WordCamp.

During one discussion about using WordPress to help change the world, I ventured to mention that WordPress.com could be a solution for non-profits looking to set up a secure site, and was rebuffed by the presenter that WordPress.com (the “c” word) is not a fully developed alternative to running a standalone WordPress install or is something to be used “temporarily” until you can set up a standalone WordPress install in the future.

Of course, developers, who usually are the main participants at WordCamp, have little or no interest in promoting or recommending WordPress.com because they can’t use their coding skills to create a website here and, as a result, can’t earn an income from it. While that may be true, it certainly hasn’t stopped people like Om Malik, Michael Arrington, Dan Ariely, The British Museum, TED Talks, flickr and quite a number of other WordPress.com (and WordPress.com VIP) users, everyone from authors to non-profits to zoologists, from setting up shop here. (Check out the WordPress.com Showcase!)

(If you want to see the reasons why I believe WordPress.com can work for a wide variety of people, you can read my posts here and here.)

Also sadly, many developers are not aware that WordPress.com has a developer resources site for those who want to make apps available to the more than 30 million websites hosted here. Let me repeat that number: 30 million websites. Here, too, I understand devs resistance to creating apps for WordPress.com, which is a for-profit company run by Automattic, and not the open source project of WordPress.

Regardless, I truly feel that while WordPress.com may not be the right solution for absolutely everyone, it is the best solution for everyone else.

wpcom-hoz

10 Insights from Quillcards

Not just the “how” but also the “why.” Excellent advice. Planning is the key and this is true for WordPress.com bloggers as well.

Update on WordCamp Jerusalem 2013

wcjeru-2013This year’s WordCamp Jerusalem is coming together very quickly!

English speakers will be treated to 2 sessions (so far):
Kimanzi Constable on “The Power of Your Story on WordPress”
and Deena Levenstein on “WordPress website planning – sitemaps, wireframes and more”  (Deena also gave a talk at the 2011 WordCamp Jerusalem about setting up house on WordPress.com, and you can find her slides in my post on the conference.)

A full list of the current speakers and their topics is available on the speakers page.

If you’re thinking of attending this excellent event (a little over 3 weeks to go), now is the time to register as there’s a price increase on the 1st of February. Head over to the WordCamp Jerusalem website and click the green הרשמה button in the upper left corner of any page.

Want to get the most out of the event? Here are some excellent tips via @avihein on twitter

And the search is on for additional sponsors, but time is short. If your organization works with or benefits from WordPress and supports the open source software movement, why not make a contribution to the one event that brings together the entire local WordPress community? Interested? Check out the Sponsors page on the event site. Thanks!

Meetup WP TLV

wptlv-smallWordPress has a very large user/developer base here in Israel and besides the excellent WordCamp Jerusalem event next month, we are now fortunate to have a WordPress Meetup group that gets together once a month in Tel Aviv. Moshe Kaplan (dSero) started the group after he surprisingly discovered there wasn’t one here.

Usually held in Hebrew, the previous event I attended was aimed at those who deal with English-speaking markets and revolved around marketing your site and your message. The speakers were:

Sarah Tuttle-Singer, Social Media Director of “The Times of Israel”, who spoke on “Operation Take Back The Media: How to talk about Israel so people will listen?” (twitter: @expatbarbie)

Ben Lang: Developer and all-around Internet Wunderkind speaking on the projects he developed that can help you market your site/idea (twitter: @benln)

Shira Abel, head of Hunter & Bard, a marketing firm specializing in helping Startups, which Israel has quite a number.  Shira was to speak on “How to design a blog that is aimed at the US market” but due to technical difficulties gave us an energetic Q&A session. (twitter: @shiraabel)

A full recap of this excellent session can be found on the dSero blog, including everyone’s slides.

Upcoming session on Sunday, 10 February 3 February at 17:30 (A Mini-Hackathon – details here)

Israel’s Best Kept Secret? WordCamp Jerusalem on 20 February

wcjeru-2013Hard to believe that we’re only a month and a week away from WordCamp Jerusalem 2013! This year’s full-day event is scheduled for February 20th at the Leonardo Hotel in Jerusalem. While the details are still barely penciled in, it appears that this event will again be focusing on the local, Hebrew-speaking WP community as it did in 2011.
Continue reading “Israel’s Best Kept Secret? WordCamp Jerusalem on 20 February”