Some thoughts on this 2015 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 2,900 times in 2015. If it were a cable car, it would take about 48 trips to carry that many people.

This past year saw a lot of changes here at WordPress.com and a lot of my time was spent in the Community Forums fielding user reaction and questions to those same changes.

WordPress.com continues to be a very popular destination for new bloggers to open a website, but those same new bloggers seem to be overwhelmed with the amount of information available to them that doesn’t always make sense because they are new bloggers. According to Matt Mullenweg in an interview on Brian Krogsgard’s PostStatus at the end of November, 96% of new signups on WordPress.com abandon their site within a short period. To try and help turn that tide, WordPress.com’s companion site, The Daily Post, has been running BloggingU, which should be the first stop for any new blogger here. Beyond the nuts and bolts, BloggingU gives you a firm ground into why blog or set up a site. There were 40,000 BloggingU “grads” last year and 2016’s courses are expected to be even more popular (January and February’s Blogging101 are already full!). Announcements about available courses come out regularly, so if you aren’t yet following The Daily Post, you’ll want to do so.

On a personal note, 2016 will be a milestone year for me and during the coming months WPcomMaven will be undergoing a transformation from a reactive site to a proactive site. More on that later.

Wishing all my readers a happy and fulfilling 2016!

WordPress.com Reveals its Newest New Dash Editor

editor-announce1If you’ve been following the story, you know that the New Dash Post and Page Editor has been a continual work-in-progress since its introduction. This week, WordPress.com revealed the latest iteration of the Editor, according to the News announcement, based on feedback received from its users and is designed to be used on all devices, laptop and mobile.

While offering several major improvements to previous versions, this version of the New Dash Editor is not final, as @designsimply (WPcom Staff) explains in the Support forum thread dedicated to feedback.

Updates to bring in more features will be ongoing. If you find something you love is missing, make a note here and we’ll keep track of the requests so that data can be used as one part of future decision-making. We also look at other factors such as usage stats when making decisions.

Scrolling through the comments in that Support forum thread, currently 14 pages long, some major features appear not to have been brought over from the earlier iteration of the New Dash or from the WP Admin Post Editor. They include:

  • Link Manager doesn’t display previous content for easy linking
  • Image resizing
  • Basic image editing (rotating, cropping, etc.)
  • No toolbar buttons in HTML tab
  • No word count
  • No spell check
  • Copy a post feature (only available in the WP Admin Editor)
  • Request Feedback (only available in the WP Admin Editor)

If you are using the New Dash Post Editor and have concrete feedback about the New Editor, please add it in the Support forum thread for that purpose. Staff are addressing these concerns quickly and adding feature requests.

Again for users who wish to write in their own site’s WP Admin Post Editor, the easiest and quickest way to reach it is to log in on your own WordPress.com website rather than on the WordPress.com homepage. You can do this by adding wp-admin/ to the end of your own site URL.

For clarity, I create my posts almost exclusively in the WP Admin Post and Page Editor because that is how I learned to write with WordPress.com. Any changes to this Editor are made following changes to WordPress core (i.e. standalone WP).  My thinking is that the move to the New Dash reflects the desire on the part of WordPress/WordPress.com to have a common intersection for standalone WordPress users/WordPress.com sites, especially since jetpack users must have a WordPress.com username account. The fact that the jetpack module for standalone WP users is called “Manage” seems to reinforce this thought.

The one feature I would dearly love to see cross-pollinated to the WP Admin Post Editor is the way that Galleries are created and inserted. The New Post Editor does this far more intuitively than the WP Admin Editor currently does. But that will be a different post on a different site and will be reblogged here.

Have you tried newly reintroduced New Dash Editor? What are your thoughts, feelings? Does it do what you need it to do? Your comments are welcome!